Crochet Ribbed Scarf. It’s like knitting, only better!

December 1, 2010 by Jenn

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Knitted scarves are beautifully and soft, but they take FOREVER to make (to a crocheter anyway)

Crochet scarves are often kinda ugly and kinda stiff; crochet is more dense than knitting, and doesnt have the nice soft drape.

That is, Until now! I experimented with a lot of stitches to find one that would LOOK nice (on BOTH sides of the piece, who wants a one-sided scarf?), would FEEL nice (not too dense, and with smooth stitches that glide across skin as knitting does), AND that wouldn’t take too long to make.

There were a few stitches that fit one or two of those categories; there is a single crochet ribbing technique that has a nice look and feel, but single crocheting an entire scarf takes awhile. Tunisian stitches are very soft and beautiful on one side, but they are also very dense and stiff, and the backside is very messy. Working in the back or front post of half double crochet or double crochet stitches can also create some nice ribbing, but it is also a bit dense.

What I finally settled on is this beautiful variation of a half double crochet stitch. I absolutely LOVE the look and feel of these scarves. And the stitch is SO EASY!

What this half double crochet variation does is allow the top of the crochet stitch, which looks like a line of knitting, to appear on the work:

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Normally the top of the stitch is covered up by the next row of stitches, but half double crochet creates an extra loop which will be used instead of the top of the stitch, so the top of the stitch can become a pretty ribbing. Confused? Just keep reading. It’s easy, I promise.

Here’s how it’s done:

**You will need to know how to half double crochet to make this ribbed stitch. Half Double Crochet is an easy and basic crochet stitch; if you’re not sure how to do it, just do a quick search online. Once you are used to working half double crochet, you are ready to make the scarf.

1. Start with a row of half double crochet

2. The following rows will also all be worked in half double crochet stitches, but you will insert the hook into the extra loop BELOW the gap where you would normally insert the hook.

**You won’t really see the ribbing effect until after a few rows. So don’t give up on it too soon!

Some pictures to help:

Here’s where the hook is typically inserted into your work (but this is NOT how you will do this scarf)

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Again, the above picture show where you do NOT want to insert the hook for this ribbed stitch. The hook needs to be inserted around the loop right BELOW where you would normally insert the hook:

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The extra loop is there because you are using a half double crochet stitch. If you were using a single or double crochet, the extra loop would not be there.

If you are wondering why there are 3 loops on the hook, the 2nd loop is just a yarn over. And if you’re wondering why the extra loops are purple…Photoshop.

Aside from inserting the hook in a different spot, the stitch is exactly like a regular half double crochet. That’s all there is to it!  Just half double crochet the entire scarf, but keep inserting the hook in the extra loop below the gap where you would normally insert the hook.

And a reminder, you won’t really see the ribbing effect until after you’ve finished a few rows. So don’t quit too early, give it a chance, this stitch is fabulous.

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What pretty crochet ribbing :)

If you use the stitch, and maybe make a scarf for yourself or a loved one this winter, let me know how it worked out for you! Also, if anything is unclear, feel free to ask for some help or clarification! Thanks for reading :)

477 thoughts on “Crochet Ribbed Scarf. It’s like knitting, only better!

  1. IC Strategy says:

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  2. Sabra says:

    Wow!! Just what I was looking for. I am going to give this a try today. Thank you so!!! much. :)

  3. Janette says:

    I’m wondering how to start this. I’ve made one already but I came back to this site to remind myself what to do after I’ve chained 5 feet. The second row, what do you do? I know from that point on, but the second row is blocked from my memory for some reason. Thanks in advance!

    • Jennifer Daniel says:

      I crocheted a 5 ft chain, then I hdc into the 2nd chain from the hook, and all the way to the end. After I added 1 chain loop, and then turned. I began to now Hdc into the area that’s been told for the pattern. I continue to do this until my desired width. At the end/last row, I add regular hdc all the way across. I end my piece, and weave in all my ends. I added tassels/6 of them equally at the ends to finish it. The scarf came out beautifully. Thank you to the pattern sharer. I just love sharing patterns and working patterns out.

  4. Stephanie says:

    How much yarn does it take to make this? Thank you for sharing!!!!!

    • Kayla says:

      Oh, also… I used less than two “balls” of Caron Simply Soft Yarn, which is 6 oz./170 g, or 315 yds each. I was starting with a partially used “ball” and then had to start a new one because I ran out of the other. Could only take one ball, or one and a little more, depending on the length and width of yarn. I used an I/9 – 5.50 hook.

  5. Anita Marovac says:

    Seems to be just what I was looking for.

    Do you have an actual pattern…number of stitches, amount,of yarn, etc.?

  6. Denise says:

    Jenn: love this pattern, I have made several swatches up to figure it out. Please tell me do you hdc through the end chain ? Mine does not look as your end does. This has the look of ribbing but not huge stretch correct?

  7. Beverly says:

    I just mastered how to do the foundation HDC and searched for HDC patterns, this pattern is perfect, thank you so much for sharing it. The foundation HDC gave me the first Row and it looks great. THANKS again for the pattern and pictures of how to make the ribbed look.

  8. trish says:

    Is there a pattern to follow or you just showing how to do the stitch and I come up with my own pattern. I haven’t been doing this very long. I really like this scarf after searching the web for hours !

  9. F Arthur says:

    My scarf tends to curl around itself instead of lying flat any suggestions. I love the pattern and how quickly it goes.

    • Lindsey says:

      Try checking your guage, my work often curled as a beginner and it was usually because my guage had changed. I started checking my guage frequently until my stitches became more consistent.

  10. […] of a cowl on my poncho, I picked up all 80 stitches that I had started with, using sc’s. A ribbed look was what I was after, so I turned my work after every round of 80 sc’s and of course […]

  11. marilyn says:

    how do I print this, right now I don’t have a computer.

  12. Joan says:

    This pattern is exactly what I was looking for but I’m a little confused. Do I make a chain as long as I want my scarf, then start with the half crochet? Then crohet how-ever-many rows until it is the width I want??

    Thanks!

  13. Anonymous says:

    Thanks for stitch:)

  14. Zoey says:

    Hi I have been following your instructions on crocheting this scarf. However, my scarf turns out that the ribbing v part of the scarf keep turning downwards instead of facing upwards like in your photos. Do you know if I am doing something wrong? Please help. Thank you!

  15. Marcia says:

    can I get the pattern for the ribbed scarf. Yours scarf is beautiful. thanks

  16. Anonymous says:

    Not very good instructions! But a nice scarf!

  17. Kayla says:

    I made a scarf of similar color for a craft ministry at my parents’ church. The pattern, once you get the hang of it, is very simple, even for a beginner crocheter like me. :) Thanks for the beautiful scarf pattern! Mine is a similar shade of red as the pic posted here. Oh, I did have trouble keeping the ends even, but still looks good, nonetheless. ;)

  18. Kayla says:

    Here’s how I did my scarf, based on this pattern. :) Hope it helps and makes sense to y’all. Since I’m a newbie, this is about as simple as it gets. Lol

    Step 1: Chain 225 + 2 more for the turning chain. In 3rd ch from hook, hdc, & then hdc in each ch across. (This should end up being about 5 ft long. If you want a longer scarf, chain until desired length).

    Step 2: Ch 2 for turning ch and hdc in stitch below the gap where you normally insert the hook. Do this all the way across.

    Repeat step 2 until scarf is desired width.

  19. […] softer than most crochet scarves and it looks really interesting because of the ribbing. I used Jenn Ozkan‘s Crochet Ribbed Scarf – it’s not quite a pattern because it’s just so […]

  20. Hannah says:

    Could you use this stitch for a blanket? Obviously just making the scarf but a lot wider? Thanks.

  21. weight loss says:

    Great articles you post on your blog, i have shared this article on my facebook

  22. Nancy says:

    Love this stitch…thank you! I used this stitch/pattern to make a keyhole scarf for my husband. It turned out beauitfully. Now I’m using this same ribbed stitch to crochet a vest for myself. Thank you!

  23. Jan Downing says:

    I would like the pattern for this beautiful scarf please

  24. christine says:

    IS THIS SOMETHING THAT CAN BE WORN BY MEN? I HAVE LOOKED ALL OVER AND ONLY FOUND ONE PATTERN FOR A CROCHETED INFINITY SCARF FOR A MAN. I AM ON A BORROWED COMPUTER SO IF YOU COULD PLEASE EMAIL ME I WOULD APPRECIATE IT. THANK YOU SO MUCH

  25. Debbie Jean says:

    Boy! It would be nice if you actually listed the instructions instead of everyone trying to guess it!! The above instructions is not very good!

  26. jj says:

    Could you convert this pattern into an infinity scarf or cowl?

  27. This looks great. I have made infinity scarves using spiral technique and they looked great, but I think I like this look better. I’ve also found that doing my first row after the foundation chain in the back “bump” is really pretty too but quite time-consuming! Thanks for sharing this, and I think the instructions were perfectly clear and this is my next project.

    Anne

  28. Lisa says:

    The instructions were just fine. Thank you for the free pattern. It’s exactly what I needed!

  29. Linda says:

    I just finished my scarf and it looks great. I used some Hobby Lobby yarn called Aurora Borealis, which has lots of colors. I am just learning to crochet, and I always have trouble on my first row into the chain – it wants to twist and I lose track of where I’m supposed to put the hook, but once I got that row finished, it was super easy! Thanks for the instructions. Here’s a link to a photo. http://www.justwant2knit.blogspot.com

  30. Ana says:

    I use half dc to make infinity scarfs using Lion Hometown Chunky yarn which has a beautiful drape when finished. I make the scarf like you would a regular scarf (ch 90 -100) then twist once and bind the ends together. Looks great!

  31. Neeta Maharaj says:

    Could I have instruction please….
    Thanks

  32. Will you send me the whole instructions, I will send this to my daughter and granddaughter. Thank you.

  33. Nina says:

    I’m so glad I found your tutorial for this scarf! The ribbing comes out sooooooooo much nicer than just going into the back stitch, and the directions were very easy to follow! Even though spring/summer is right around the corner I will definitely be making another scarf very, very soon! Thank you so much for sharing!

  34. La Dell says:

    I did it! It IS easy, and it’s just like she showed in the pics!!!!! I did a sample with bright yellow yarn and a size 8mm hook. I also did Hdc no chain foundation. Your first crochet row starts out with the stitch. Look at the pic closely. See where you would normally put your hook for the “usual” hdc? Make believe you are going to insert your hook there but stop yourself……Now look down right under your hook, right under the stitch your are ready to go into. There is a little “line” of yarn laying there. THAT is what you insert your hook into and make the hdc stitch. Go to the next stitch. Look at where you would put your hook normally……stop!! look straight down under those loops. There is the little line of yarn…..put your hook under that line and make a hdc crochet! Look closely again at the pics. See the purple little line under the cream stitch? Thats it!!! THAT’S where you insert your hook!!! just like the hook in the picture!!! I am an almost beginning crocheter. I have made simple dishcloths, and dog blankies for the shelter and rescue dogs. This tutorial is just fine, well done in fact…..you just have to think about it first. I would probably use an I (5.5mm) or J(6mm) hook. Next I’m going to try it holding two strands of yarn together. I’m coming to this post late, and no one will probably ever see it, but the directions ARE clear and EASY and I am GRATEFUL for the sharing of the pattern!!!!!

  35. Diann says:

    I used this stitch to make hats which turn out very nice. I love this stitch for different things.

  36. Diann says:

    I use this stitch to make hats as well as many other things. I love this stitch.

  37. […] you want. I used the Crochet Ribbed Scarf pattern by Jenn Ozkan. You can find the instructions here. I made mine using Bernat Satin yarn in Admiral (blue) and Bordeaux (red), alternating them ever […]

  38. Elaine says:

    Love this design! I’m a beginner and was looking for a simple scarf to crochet for my husband. There’s a great tutorial on how to do the half double crochet foundation chain here and then the rest of the pattern makes sense!
    http://www.mooglyblog.com/foundation-half-double-crochet/ (and tutorials on just about everything else you need to get started).

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